Tromboncino

What to grow in Spring

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All the things!

I know, I know, Spring for us in the subtropical climate here in Brisbane is like the summer for most other climates. It, with Autumn, is one of the most ideal growing conditions for us.

We have to be super organised to make sure we get things in before summer hits and kills our gardening dreams.

So with that said what are some things that I love to grow.

Tromboncino

It’s like a zucchini, but if you leave it on the vine it will be more like a butternut. It’s so versatile, and it takes up less space because it climbs. These guys do not like humidity so you need to get them in early.

Cucumbers

Our kids eat cucumbers like they breathe. They are a sure fire staple in our household so they have to be grown. I opt for Lebanese varieties as I am lazy and don’t like to peel the thick skins of some of the traditional varieties. This year I will be experimenting with a bunch of different types.

Bush Beans

My favourite tasting bean is the blue lake, closely followed by the Royal Burgundy. I don’t waste my time on tasteless beans these days.

Cherry Tomatoes

My favourite right now is a yellow cherry tomato called honey bee – it’s so sweet and prolific.

Zucchini

Zucchini are notoriously bad for getting powdery mildew when it gets too humid, I like to get these guys pumping out the zukes early in spring. They are so versatile and a great staple to have in the garden.

Corn

There is nothing better than fresh corn right from the garden! This year I am going to be experimenting with loads of different varieties (not at the same time as they cross pollinate) and hope to try some popping corn.

Sweet Basil

I have loads of different perennial basils in our garden, but really there is nothing that beats the taste of a lush sweet basil. They do survive our heat in summer but I make sure I get loads to stock the freezer up with a supply of pesto and the pantry with dried basil over the cooler months.

There are so many more and I could keep on going, if you want to grab the full list of things to plant this month you can grab my printable guide here.

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