Zucchini that has been pollinated

My zucchinis aren’t growing and rotting at the ends

Do you have a problem with your zucchinis (or squash or pumpkin or cucumbers) being stunted and not progressing past the size of your thumb?

Perhaps they are getting to a certain size and then they just start rotting.

There are two reasons that this can occur…

Not pollinated

The first, the most common that I have found is the fruit has not been pollinated. This will be extremely common in areas that lack bees, but also if you only have one plant and your male vs female flower ratio is off.

Butternut pumpkin female flower that hasn't been pollinated
Butternut pumpkin female flower that hasn’t been pollinated

The plant should produce a sway of male flowers before the female flowers as a way of bringing the bees to the yard, but often some hybrid varieties will just go nuts with both flowers.

Butternut pumpkin female flower
Butternut pumpkin female flower – see the tiny fruit

 

Each plant has a male and female flower, you can tell the difference as the female flower will have what looks like a tiny fruit at the end of the flower. The male flower is just a flower.

QLD blue pumpkin male flower
Butternut pumpkin male flower

You can take matters into your own hands by doing the job of the bees and moving some of the male pollen onto the female flower (a paintbrush, cotton tip or just your fingers will do the trick). Or better yet, make sure you plant heaps of plants around that will bring in the bees.

As the fruit is growing, you can tell if it hasn’t been pollinated as the flower on the end of the fruit will shrivel and look brown. A pollinated fruit will look plump and have a bit of colour to it.

Zucchini that has been pollinated
Zucchini that has been pollinated – see the plump flower

Blossom End Rot

Another reason for the rotting of the end of your fruit and not growing is Blossom End Rot, it’s common to see this in tomatoes, but it does affect the squash family as well.

Blossom End Rot isn’t a disease, it’s due to the plant’s inability to get calcium, which can be caused by a few things:

  • Lack of calcium in the soil in general (restore it by adding Dolomite Lime or crushed eggshells)
  • Soil PH is either too high or too low (do a PH test to check)
  • Disturbed roots of the plant
  • Watering inconsistency

 

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